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Who Frustration is Good For

Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy went fairly viral so you may already be well familiar with it. If so, feel free to skip down past both pictures; I’m going to spend the intervening paragraphs explaining what the game is and how it works.

Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy

Bennett Foddy is a connoisseur of frustration. His first hit game, QWOP, took the simple act of running and made it nearly impossible by wrapping it in a seemingly-straightforward four-button control scheme with each button dedicated to a thigh or calf muscle. He’s made a few other games along similar lines, but his latest work, Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy, takes things to a new level.

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Capsule Review: Outland

A gorgeous 2D-platformer with Metroidvania and bullet hell elements. While many powers you gain over the course of the game are related to combat or traversal, you also get the ability to switch between blue and red. The environment has platforms, hazards, and enemies of both colors. You have to be the right color to ride a platform, avoid damage from a hazard, or deal damage to an enemy - which can mean rapid Ikaruga-like switching as the bullet hell ramps up.

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Capsule Review: Picdun 2: Witch's Curse

A fairly simple first-person grid-based dungeon-crawler. You always have one of three partner characters with you, each with different strengths for the game’s active but streamlined combat. Press one button to do a single-target attack (which the archer excels at), press another button to attack all enemies (which the whipper excels at), and another button to block enemy attacks - do it with perfect timing and execute the QTE that follows to unleash a super attack (which the spellcaster excels at).

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Capsule Review: Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call

A rhythm game tribute to the long-running Final Fantasy series. There are songs and characters from essentially every game in the franchise (and some from other Square Enix titles through DLC). Songs are grouped into a few different kinds of levels depending on the nature of the music - battle music has you fighting a series of monsters, event music plays over cutscenes, and field music has you journeying through the game world.

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