Article Tags / shamus-young (3)

Uninformed Economic Voters

Recently, your friend and mine Cliff Bleszinski wrote an essay defending microtransactions in general and EA in specific. There are a lot of things to be said about this essay - some of which are said expertly by Jim Sterling here, and some of which touch on concepts discussed by Shamus Young writing a couple of years ago about Bobby Kotick here and here.

Cliff’s main point is that game developers exist within an economic landscape, and as such they will do what makes them money and avoid what doesn’t. As consumers, our job is to vote with our wallets, supporting what we like and boycotting what we don’t.

In response to this, I’m going to finally post something I wrote back in October 2011. I never put it up before because I couldn’t find a way to turn it into a full article. It’s really just one simple idea. But as foreseen by Nathan Grayson and proved by the recent SimCity debacle, if anything it’s more relevant today than it was a year and a half ago.

In Praise of Easy: Lowering the Barrier to Entry

Easy Button

The challenge/punishment confusion is a major source of disagreement about video game difficulty, but it’s not the only one. Even when we have set punishment aside and are very clearly discussing only challenge, we run into trouble. Let’s take a look at the question of how much “easy” there should be in games:

Test Skills, Not Patience: Challenge, Punishment, and Learning

You and your friends are dead. Game Over.

Difficulty in games is a popular and thorny subject. Are games easier than they used to be? Does easier mean worse? Are games being “dumbed down”? And how do the dreaded “casual players” fit in?

The problem with these questions is that it is not productive to discuss difficulty as a single quantity. The term “difficulty” as it is commonly used encompasses two almost completely separate phenomena, with profoundly different effects on the player: